Aerospace Forgings

 

Forgings refer to products manufactured by the process of shaping metal utilizing compressive forces. The compressive forces used are generally delivered via pressing, pounding, or squeezing under great pressure. Although there are many different kinds of forging processes available, they can be grouped into three main classes:

 

  Drawn out: length increases, cross-section decreases
  Upset: length decreases, cross-section increases
  Squeezed in closed compression dies: produces multidirectional flow


Forging produces pieces that are stronger than an equivalent cast or machined part. As the metal is shaped during the forging process, the internal grain deforms to follow the general shape of the part. This results in a grain that is continuous throughout the part, resulting in its high strength characteristics. Forgings are broadly classified as either cold, warm or hot forgings, according to the temperature at which the processing is performed.


Iron and steel are nearly always hot forged, which prevents the work hardening that would result from cold forging. Work hardening increases the difficulty of performing secondary machining operations on the metal pieces. When work hardening is desired, other methods of hardening, most notably heat treating, may be applied to the piece. Alloys such as aluminum and titanium that are amenable to precipitation hardening can be hot forged, followed by hardening. Because of their high strength, forgings are almost always used where reliability and human safety are critical such as in the aerospace, automotive, ship building, oil drilling, engine and petrochemical industries.

 

For more information or to receive a prompt aluminum price quote, please contact us at 800 398-4345 or submit the Request Information form on the right side of this page.

 

 

              

 

HIGH TEMP SUPER ALLOY FORGING
TYPE SPECIFICATIONS
AERMET 100™ AMS6532
A286 AMS5731, 5731, 5737, B50T1180
HASTELLOY X± AMS5754, B50TF31
HAYNES 188± AMS5772, B50TF74
HAYNES 230± AMS5891, ASTM-B564
HAYNES 25± (L605) AMS5759
INCONEL 600* AMS5665, ASTM-B564
INCONEL 625* AMS5666, B50TF133, ASTB-B564
INCONEL 718* AMS5662, 5663, 5664, B50TF15, C50TF103
INCONEL X-750* AMS5667, 5668, 5670, 5671, 5747, B50T1232
MONEL 400* ASTM-B164, QQ-N-281
MONEL K500* AMS4676, QQ-N-286, ASTM-B564
RENE 41* AMS5712, 5713, B50TF75, B50TF110
WASPALOY• AMS5704, 5706, 5707, 5708, 5709

 

TITANIUM FORGING
TYPE SPECIFICATIONS
CP-GRADES 1, 2, 3, 4 AMS4921, ASTM-B348
6Al-4V AMS4928, 4931, 4965, AMS-T-9047, C50TF12
6Al-4V ELI AMS4930, 4931, 6932, BMS-7-269
6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo AMS495, 4976, B50TF22
6Al-6V-2Sn AMS4978
8Al-1Mo-1V AMS4972, 4973, C50T81
10V-2Fe-3Al AMS4983

 

ALLOY STEEL FORGING
TYPE SPECIFICATIONS
4130 AMS6370, AMS-S-6758
4140 AMS6382, AMS-S-5626
4330 MOD AMS6411, 6427
4340 AMS6414, 6415
4340 MOD / 300M AMS6257, 6417, 6419, MIL-S-8844 CL-3
8620 AMS6274, 6276
8740 AMS6322, AMS-S-6049
9310 AMS6260, 6265
52100 AMS6440, 6444
NITRALLOY 135 MOD AMS6470, 6471

 

ALUMINUM FORGING
TYPE SPECIFICATIONS
2014 AMS4133, 4134, 4314, AMS-A-22771
2024 AMS-QQ-A-367
2219 AMS4143, 4144, AMS-QQ-A-367, AMS-A-22771
2618 AMS4132, AMS-QQ-A-367, AMS-A-22771
6061 AMS4127, 4146, AMS-QQ-A-367, AMS-A-22771
7049 AMS4111, AMS-QQ-A-367, AMS-A-22771
7050 AMS4107, 4108, AMS-A-22771
7075 AMS4126, 4131, 4141, 4147, AMS-QQ-A-367
7079 AMS-QQ-A-367
7150 AMS-A-22771
7175 AMS4148, 4149, 4179, AMS-A-22771

 

STAINLESS STEEL FORGING
TYPE SPECIFICATIONS
PH13-8MO AMS5629
15-5PH AMS5659
15-7PH AMS5657
17-4PH AMS5643
17-7PH AMS5644
AM-355 AMS5743
CUSTOM 455 AMS5617
304, 304L AMS5639
304, 304L AMS5653
321 AMS5645
347 AMS5646
410 AMS5613
416 AMS5610
418 (GREEK ASCOLOY) AMS5616
420 AMS5620
430 AMS5627
431 AMS5628
440A AMS5631
440C AMS5630
NITRONIC 40 AMS5656
NITRONIC 50 AMS5764
NITRONIC 60 AMS5848

 

± Trademark Haynes • Trademark United Technology
* Trademark Inco Alloys ™ Trademark Carpenter

 

OPEN DIE FORGING

 

Open die forging is performed between flat dies with no precut profiles in the dies. Movement of the work piece is the key to this method. Larger parts over 200,000 lbs. and 80 feet in length can be hammered or pressed into shape this way.

 

Open-die forging can produce forgings from a few pounds up to more than 150 tons. Called open-die because the metal is not confined laterally by impression dies during forging, this process progressively works the starting stock into the desired shape, most commonly between flat-faced dies. In practice, open-die forging comprises many process variations, permitting an extremely broad range of shapes and sizes to be produced. In fact, when design criteria dictate optimum structural integrity for a huge metal component, the sheer size capability of open-die forging makes it the clear process choice over non-forging alternatives. At the high end of the size range, open-die forgings are limited only by the size of the starting stock, namely, the largest ingot that can be cast. Practically all forgeable ferrous and non-ferrous alloys can be open-die forged, including some exotic materials like age-hardening superalloys and corrosion-resistant refractory alloys.

 

SEAMLESS ROLLED RING FORGING

 

Seamless rolled ring forging is typically performed by punching a hole in a thick, round piece of metal (creating a donut shape), and then rolling and squeezing (or in some cases, pounding) the donut into a thin ring. Ring diameters can be anywhere from a few inches to 30 feet.  Rings forged by the seamless ring rolling process can weigh < 1 lb up to 350,000 lbs., while O.D.’s range from just a few inches up to 30-ft. in diameter. Performance-wise, there is no equal for forged, circular-cross-section rings used in energy generation, mining, aerospace, off-highway equipment and other critical applications.

 

High tangential strength and ductility make forged rings well-suited for torque- and pressure-resistant components, such as gears, engine bearings for aircraft, wheel bearings, couplings, rotor spacers, sealed discs and cases, flanges, pressure vessels and valve bodies. Materials include not only carbon and alloy steels, but also non-ferrous alloys of aluminum, copper and titanium, as well as nickel-base superalloys.

 

For more information or to receive a prompt metal forging price quote, please contact us at
800 398-4345 or submit the Request Information form on the right side of this page.

  REQUEST INFORMATION

 

 

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Forgings

 

Forged parts vary in size, shape and sophistication and can be produced using nearly any metal. The most common metals used include carbon, alloy, tool and stainless steels as well as aluminum, titanium, high-temperature superalloys, brass and copper.

High strength-to-weight ratios and structural reliability favorably influence performance, range and payload capabilities in the aerospace industry. Made of ferrous, non-ferrous and special alloy materials, forgings are widely used in jets and piston-engine planes, helicopters, engine mounts, military aircraft and spacecraft. Some examples of where a forging's versatility of size, shape and properties make it an ideal component include bulkheads, wing roots and spars, hinges, engine mounts, brackets, beams, shafts, landing gear cylinders and struts, wheels, brake carriers and discs and arresting hooks. In jet turbine engines, iron-base, nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys are forged into components such as discs, blades, buckets, couplings, manifolds, rings, chambers and shafts.

 

 

Technical Data Links

 

TECHNICAL DATA LINKS
Aluminum 2014A Composition Spec
Aluminum 2024A Composition Spec
Aluminum 2618A Composition Spec
Aluminum 6061A Composition Spec
Aluminum 7049A Composition Spec
Aluminum 7050A Composition Spec
Aluminum 7150 Composition Spec
Titanium Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si; Duplex Annealed
Carpenter AerMet 100, 900°F Aged
Carpenter AerMet 100, 875°F Aged
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at RT
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at 538°C (1000°F)
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at 649°C (1200°F)
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at 760°C (1400°F)
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at 871°C (1600°F)
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at 982°C
Haynes® 230® alloy, as cast vacuum investment casting, tested at 1093°C
Haynes® 25 alloy, vacuum investment castings, solution treated, tested at RT
Haynes® 25 alloy, vacuum investment castings, solution treated, tested at 425°C (800°F)
Haynes® 25 alloy, vacuum investment castings, solution treated, tested at 650°C (1200°F)
Haynes® 25 alloy, vacuum investment castings, solution treated, tested at 760°C (1400°F)
Haynes® 25 alloy, vacuum investment castings, solution treated, tested at 870°C (1600°F)
Haynes® 25 alloy, vacuum investment castings, solution treated, tested at 980°C (1800°F)
Special Metals MONEL™ Alloy 400
Special Metals MONEL™ Alloy K-500
Allegheny Ludlum Grade 1 Titanium (UNS R50250)
Allegheny Ludlum Grade 2 Titanium (UNS R50400)
Allegheny Ludlum Grade 3 Titanium (UNS R50550)
Allegheny Ludlum Grade 4 Titanium (UNS R50700)
Allegheny Ludlum Titanium 6Al-4V ELI (UNS R56401)
MetalTek WASPALOY® Centri-Vac Nickel Cobalt Based Alloy
TIMETAL® 10-2-3 Titanium Alloy (Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al), Aged Billet/Bar per ASTM 4984
TIMETAL® 10-2-3 Titanium Alloy (Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al), Aged Billet/Bar per ASTM 4986
TIMETAL® 10-2-3 Titanium Alloy (Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al), Aged Billet/Bar per ASTM 4987
TIMETAL® 35A CP Titanium (ASTM Grade 1)
TIMETAL® 50A CP Titanium (ASTM Grade 2)
TIMETAL® 6-2-4-6 Titanium Alloy (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo), Beta Forged + STA
TIMETAL® 62S Titanium Alloy (Ti-6Al-2Fe-0.1Si); Alpha-Beta Forged, RA
TIMETAL® 62S Titanium Alloy (Ti-6Al-2Fe-0.1Si); Beta Forged
TIMETAL® 65A CP Titanium (ASTM Grade 3)
TIMETAL® 75A CP Titanium (ASTM Grade 4)

 

 

 

ASM Aerospace Specification Metals Inc.
2501 N.W. 34th Place #B28
Pompano Beach, Florida 33069
(954) 977-0666